Top 5 best practices for improving user experience (UX) with localisation

Top 5 best practices for improving user experience (UX) with localisation

When it comes to improving user navigation and facilitating customer searches online, localisation and UX (user experience) go hand-in-hand. These two key factors work together to streamline the customer’s purchasing journey, optimizing the e-commerce experience as a whole. Without localisation data, UX is only able to offer customers general, impersonal information that may or may not be relevant to their individual circumstances. When used alongside one another, UX and localisation encourage the user to spend more time exploring your website and consulting relevant products or services before clicking ‘Add to Basket’.

Localisation: establishing a relationship with the customer as soon as they land on the homepage

A homepage adapted to a user’s given location is likely to be met with a positive response, for a number of reasons:

  • Information is offered in the user’s chosen language
  • Locations of nearby points of sale are clearly displayed
  • The customer is informed of offers, promotions and other products available in their local area
  • Prices/fees are displayed in local currency
  • Corresponding in-store prices are also displayed

This consumer-centric approach benefits the customer in several key ways:

  1. Retailer has already considered information specific to the customer’s location (taxes, shipping duties, currency conversion etc.)
  2. The customer is more likely to feel that offers are pertinent/relevant to them
  3. A clear itinerary or map indicating nearest point of sale is offered

Store Locator, the personal shopper guiding your customer to the nearest point of sale

When it comes to making purchases online, customers value accuracy. The Store Locator automatically indicates the point of sale closest to a user’s current location, encouraging them to visit in-store rather than heading to another, better-signposted competitor.

Store Locator, the personal shopper guiding your customer to the nearest point of sale
Not only is Store Locator widget incredibly easy to install, its benefits can be seen almost immediately.

  • Accompanying digital shoppers towards their nearest, most convenient point of sale, whether they’re shopping or seeking information via a sales advisor

Product Locator: the key to securing a sale

Product Locators are even more effective than Store Locators in that they offer customers detailed information about stock levels, including reference numbers, availability, size, colour and make or model information. Usually only available to employees or in-store personnel, this data is crucial in encouraging the potential customer to begin the purchase journey – after all, who wants to miss out on a bargain? Further information about the article’s rarity or popularity is likely to encourage the customer to click ‘Add to Basket’, reserving the item until they’re done browsing.

Product Locator: the key to securing a sale
Taking this approach a step further, certain brands (Debenhams, Topshop) automatically display information about the nearest available store before offering the user the option of e-reserving their chosen item for a limited time. This gives the customer time to complete their purchase in-store, continue browsing or even change their mind.

Autocomplete effectively predicts useful information to speed up purchasing

When creating an online account, entering personal information is often viewed as an extremely time-consuming process by the customer. This is particularly true of (often demanding) mobile users, who are far more likely to make spelling or other mistakes as a result of devices with small keyboards or touchscreens.

Autocomplete effectively predicts useful information to speed up purchasing
Predictive text or autocomplete functions automatically present the user with a list of likely or relevant addresses. The advantages for the customer are obvious: quick, simple and accurate inputting of complex or lengthy billing and delivery addresses. For the retailer, Google Places Autocomplete presents detailed marketing information in a standardized format, information that can subsequently be better integrated in personalised or tailored marketing approaches. This standardisation also helps streamline the often complicated refunds/returns process.

Extensive delivery options: a major plus for online shoppers

Before finalising their purchase, the customer has to make a decision regarding delivery, whether they’re opting for in-store pickup, delivery to a local collection point, home delivery, or Click & Collect. So, which is most appropriate? The answer lies in analysing both anonymous visitor data and address information entered via Autocomplete.

Extensive delivery options: a major plus for online shoppers
Of course, the final decision ultimately lies with the customer, who may have to take into account other factors such as express delivery, fees/taxes, etc. That said, it’s important to note that offering information about delivery tracking may influence the customer’s decision regarding when, where and how they’d like their item delivered.

Although often described as an ‘invisible’ functionality, localisation is fast becoming an integral part of our daily lives. As a result, digital consumers now expect localisation to feature in some or all stages of the buying process, as well as responding positively to increased relevance, simplicity and personalisation when conducting online purchases. The UX-driven approach of today’s e-retailing industry shows no signs of slowing down – meaning it’s more important than ever that brands effectively interact with their consumers. To bring out the best in UX, localisation has to develop, evolve and innovate even further while continuing to put the consumer first – which will ultimately lead to an even more personal, personalised online experience for the customer.